Swat History

POPULATION & FIGHTING STRENGTH OF ‘BAEZAI’ AND ‘BABUZAI’ IN 1895 (PART 3)

BABUZAI: Babuzai is one of the three primary divisions of the Baezai Akozai Yusafzai. They  occupied the left bank of the Swat River above the Kuz Sulizais and below the Bar Sulizais. It included some of the most important villages of Upper Swat. The Babuzais in 1895 could probably produce some 3000 or 4,000 fighting-men in Swat. In addition to this, there was a division of the some Babuzais in the Puran valley. There number was about 2,500 including 760 fighting men.

BAEZAI: BAEZAI is one of the three great tribes which compose the Akozai branch of the Yusufzais. In 1895, they occupied the left bank of the Swat River from the borders of Kohistan as far as and including Thana. The different sections of the Baezais are as follows, beginning form the lowest end:

The Sub Sections/Khels of Kuz Sulizai are Khan Khel, Musa Khel and Aba Khel. The population of Khan Khel was 11,800 and had a fighting strength of 3000 men. The Musa Khel population was 5,500 and had a fighting strength of 1500 men. The Aba Khel had a population of 8000 and has a fighting strength of 2000 men.

In Babuzai, there were Barat Khel, Aba Khel, Akamaruf and Bami Khel sub sections. The Barat Khel had a population of 4000 in 1895 and fighting men were 1000. The Aba Khel had then a population of 5000 and having a fighting strength of 1200 men. The Akamaruf had a population of 5000 and a fighting strength of 1500. The Bami Khel has a population of 3000 and fighting men were 800. The Bar Sulizai had Maturizai, Azi Khel and Jinki Khel sub sections. The Maturizai had a population of 4500 and had 1300 fighting men. The Azi Khel had a population of 3500 and a fighting strength of 900. The Jinki Khel had a population of 4000 and fighting men were 1200. The rough estimate of total population of Baezai tribe was 72,000 and its fighting men were about 19,400.

In addition to it, they were beyond the limits of Swat valley in the Ghurband, Kana, Puran and Chakesar valleys, the drainage of which finds its way into the Indus. The principal villages of Baezai were Thana, Abuha, Barikot, Ghalegai, Mingaora, Manlawar and Charbagh. Like the rest of the Swat valley the portion occupied by the Baezai consists of a belt of irrigated ground on the river bank about one mile wide which was chiefly devoted to the cultivation of rice. That portion was much cut up by irrigation channels and was always difficult and at times impossible for the movement of British troops. Above this was the ‘barani’ or ‘lalmi ground’, which produced wheat and barley. In the lateral valleys, the hamlets and the ‘bandas’ were occupied by tenants and servants belonging to the villages below, while in the hills were numerous Gujar villages with herds of cattle and buffaloes.

BAIDARA: Baidara was Shamizai village of 250 houses of the Hassan Khel clan. It is situated close under the hills, 14 miles from the right bank of the Swat river.  It is 31 miles from the Chakdara on the road to Upper Swat. An irrigation channel flowed close by the village. In 1895, the leading Malaks were Mohibullah Khan and Apat Khan.

BAKHT-BILANA: Bakht Bilanda was a Dusha Khel village of 23 houses situated on the side of a spur south-east of  Deolai peak. The drinking water source was a stream and springs. The leading Malaks in 1895 were Alliar Khan, Zabardast Khan and Shabadin Khan.

BALALAI: Balalai was a village of 30 houses in Upper Swat on the left bank of the Swat River and about four miles northwest of Charbagh. The inhabitants belonged to the Maturizai section of Baezais. It was close to an irrigation channel.

BALOGEH: Balogeh was a settlement of tenant servants belonging to Akhund Kiley and Dagai in the Nikpi Khel valley. It is situated on the skirt of the hills about two miles from the right bank of the Swat River and contained 40 houses in 1895.

REFERENCE (SOURCE OF INFORMATION):

‘Gazetteer of Districts Adjoining the routes followed by Chitral Relief Force 1895’, Included As Part II with the title, ‘Gazetteer of Topographical and Ethnographical Information’, In ‘The ‘Military Report on Dir, Swat and Bajour’, (First Edition), Intelligence Branch , Division of the Chief of Staff, India, Shimla (1906), Pages 16-21.

TO BE CONTINUED…

The Chief Editor of the website (www.swatencyclopedia.com) is Jalal Uddin. He hails from Saidu Sharif, Swat. He is M.phil Scholar and his research field is Swat State. He regularly writes on Swat State and its various aspects.
×
The Chief Editor of the website (www.swatencyclopedia.com) is Jalal Uddin. He hails from Saidu Sharif, Swat. He is M.phil Scholar and his research field is Swat State. He regularly writes on Swat State and its various aspects.
Facebook Comments

Comment here

instagram default popup image round
Follow Me
502k 100k 3 month ago
Share